Yes. As charlie1 rightly says elsewhere, there is a lot of interest in timeshare products and there are many savvy users, who once they have learnt how to use the products to their advantage, go on to buy more timeshare products using the secondary market and so we see many users who have multiple numbers of weeks or multiple blocks of points. This is why secondary market sales seems to be largely confined to within existing timeshare users, at the moment. The general public as a whole is not aware of the great value to be had out of the correct use of timeshares.
> The primary market, which is high cost selling by developers, has been marred by the bad publicity that the sales teams have generated for the industry by using high pressure tactics to sell at all costs. These tactics, in far too many instances, have not been discouraged by the developers who have been only too happy to take their cut of the sales, no matter how unethical the practices of selling may have been.
> That said we must not apportion all the blame on the sales teams and the developers. Legislation, or lack of it, should shoulder some of the blame for the current position timeshare finds itself in. Just like Banking before it the legislators have allowed the big organisations to make up their own rules as they went along and so the consumers have become the disadvantaged ones.
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> Now and certainly in America the winds of change are blowing through timeshare and there is a continuing and ever louder voice talking of legislation being used to curb what some are terming as white collar crime in the timeshare industry. This all seems to be centered around the larger developers and legal activities by consumer led lawyers are said to be gathering pace across the pond.
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> Here in the UK and Europe we anticipate that the UK will leave the European Union soon and the legislators of Brussels who were responsible for leaving the policing of timeshare in the hands of the big developers will, hopefully, no longer be in control of some UK timeshare laws. With the demise of TATOC, the RDO will no longer be able to use them as being representative of timeshare consumers like they did last time legislation was looked at in Europe.
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> So do we consumers currently have a voice, one that is independent ? The answer is that at present we do not and never really have had any voice. Can we create one? That remains to be seen but at present we are far too fragmented and many forums are, we believe, controlled by none timeshare users whose main interest is to entice desperate people into buying into what could and usually is a dubious package of one sort or another that does not offer real value for money.
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> It is my belief that we must try to create a timeshare consumer lobby and that its structure needs to be in place by the time the UK leaves the European Union. If we can then get the UK Authorities to look at timeshare again, we may well get some positive actions that will force industry change in the UK and possibly Europe too.